Daycare Don’t Care

  

Little man at his day care intake. (Anyone else get the feeling that this picture is previewing some Godfather type stuff!?!!  He looks like he’s checking in with his cappos.). #GrahamCrackersForDays #SnackTime #SnackTimeAllTheTime #DayCare​ #DaycareGodfather #JacksonSoprano

I guess it was inevitable… Day care starts in a few weeks.  Today was his “entrance interview.”  He had fun… The teachers were nice, and the graham crackers were tasty. Guess my little guy isn’t so little anymore.  

   
 

What I Want You to Know

As we consider the possibility of sending Jackson to daycare here the four questions that were asked of us:

What are the 3 things you want your child to learn from our center:  Compassion, inquiry, problem solving

What are your child’s favorite things: His Blankie and his brothers Buster and Max

What is the one thing about your child we should know?:   He probably won’t ever know who takes care of him when he is 19 months old… He might not remember you by name… But he will remember you none the less. He will remember how you act, your body language and the tone of your voice. He won’t ever forget how you make him feel. 

What do you expect from your child care center? Communication, Positive role models, and not sending him home with the wrong parent

The Only Thing we Have to Fear is Fear Itself- (Not True)

There was this feeling of dread, like one of those deep pits in your stomach as you take your first few steps into a haunted house. Even if it’s only for a second, its still there. That feeling like you know something is might go wrong, but you just can’t figure out what it is. 
Only I new what was wrong… I knew exactly why I felt that way. I knew I hated the idea and yet knew it was in his best interest. Even still, walking though the door and having to be buzzed in, put me on the other side of the fear that goes through every parent’s mind as they leave their child in the care of someone else. 

My mind slowly began to shift from dad mode to administrative mode… The words flowed from my lips like water from a hose… “What is your security procedure for entering the building?” “Do you practice fire drills and lock down drills.” How often do you check that your doors are locked?” “Are your staff members trained in CPR/First Aid?”  

A reassuring look from the wife told me I needed to take a deep breath and listen to what the woman had to say. Problem is, I didn’t care what she had to say. I could find fault with Mother Theresa if she was sitting across from me explaining how she would care for my child.  

I wasn’t happy with the “curriculum” (he’s one), I didn’t like knowing he had to nap later than he usual does (kids at my school learn to do it without any problem), I was completely enraged when I saw the back door wide open (mistakes happen and become a learning experience). Again, I wasn’t happy because I don’t think I wanted to be happy.  

You’ve heard the horror stories… Kids getting fed mass quantities of NyQuil to shut them up, people picking up the wrong kids, kids being abused… Hell I work in a school named after a student who was tragically killed at Sandy Hook Elementary School. I know the dangers, I work tirelessly everyday to ensure the safety of the children in my building as if they were my own. 

Maybe that’s the problem. Maybe I know too much; I’ve seen too much on my end to allow myself to relax. Then again, I don’t want to think I’ve left any stone unturned when it comes to Jackson.  

Im an educator of young children; I have been my entire life. I have convinced numerous parents the benefits of early childhood education, if not for the academics than simply for the social skills and language development that is gained from being surrounded by peers. I have studied research on the brain and philosophies of how young children learn. I can rattle off the increased background knowledge and character development that students gain from structured social interactions away from their parents. I’ve seen first hand parents who are were just like me before the school year started and convinced them we would take care of their most precious possession in the world. 

Yet still…

That feeling of dread that permeated throughout my entire body that day, only increases as the we creep closer to the possibility of leaving Jackson at a daycare facility. (Even just typing that caused a knot in my stomach). It could be for 1/2 a day once a week… I’m still not sure I’m going to be OK with this. 

A Letter for Grammy Nancy

Dear Grammy,

How can I thank you for everything you do for me? I’m not even sure you know how much you do for my family. I wish I knew how to talk so I could say thank you for all the nice things you do for me, but for now this letter will have to do.

Thank you for watching me everyday while mommy and daddy work. I wish they could stay home all day and play with me and read me books, but I know they love their jobs and love making money even more. When they work I miss them a lot, but being with you and not at some strangers house helps me feel better.

Thank you for working overtime and night hours so you can help mommy and daddy during the day. You always put everyone else first even when you are feeling sick or tired. I hope one day I can do nice things for you so that you don’t have to work so many hours.

Thank you for buying me so many toys and books. Every time I like something at my house you buy it for me at your house so I always feel like I’m home. I don’t like leaving home, but I am alway so happy when I get to come to your house for the day.

Thank you for teaching me things like words and colors and shapes. I love when we get to do fruit and veggie of the day. I like getting to try to eat everything the best. I know I am going to grow up really, really smart because you teach me so much when we are together.

Thanks for always fixing stuff around my house. I feel bad, because dad always tries to fix stuff but he’s really bad at it. He always growls and yells at stuff when he is trying to fix it, but that never helps. When ever something breaks I always think to myself, “why don’t they just call Grammy?” You’re a great fixer-upper

Thank you for doggie sitting my brothers when mommy, daddy and I go out on dates. I know you watch me all week and then you sometimes watch Buster and Max on the weekend and that is really helpful to us so we can do family things. I know Buster always eats all your stuff, so you can have any of my things to make up for that. I like to share because you taught me that sharing is important.

Thank you for being patient with mommy and daddy. They are trying their best with me. I know they nag you a lot and always give you a million directions to follow even though you already know what to do. I mean you did raise mom and she’s the best mom in the whole world.

Grammy, I love you so much. Thank you for helping me grow.

Love always,
Jackson